How to treat HSP

How to treat HSP
How to treat HSP

Many of us know a Highly Sensitive Person or HSP, whether a partner, a colleague or a family member. Highly Sensitive People, or HSPs, have a nervous system that's more sensitive than most. They absorb more information from their surroundings than others and process it more deeply. It can be challenging to recognise this trait in ourselves or others as it can be confused with introversion, shyness, insecurity, anxiety or depression.

Bach flowers mix 77: High sensitivity

Bach flowers mix 77 helps highly sensitive people to:

  • Be less anxious 
  • Reduce emotional sensitivity 
  • Become more resilient to external stimuli 
  • Lose stress and tensions 
  • Dare say “no”
Discover how Bach flowers mix 77 can help you

Could you be an HSP?

Around one in five of us could be described as HSP. High sensitivity is not a mental illness, and there isn't a precise diagnosis, but there are some characteristics that are widely shared by highly sensitive people:

  • Violent TV shows or movies are too intense and unsettling for them.
  • They are profoundly moved by the beauty of nature, the human spirit and art.
  • HSPs are sometimes overwhelmed by bright lights and noisy crowds.
  • They are unusually sensitive to uncomfortable clothing.
  • HSPs often require downtime, a period of quiet in a cool, dark, peaceful room.
  • They are deep thinkers and have a rich, complex inner life with strong emotions.

If you recognise these traits in yourself, you may well be an HSP. Bach Flowers Mix 77 helps to reduce emotional sensitivity and improve resilience to environmental stimuli. In addition, it helps boost assertiveness so that you have the confidence to say "no" to things you aren't comfortable with.

HSPs in the work environment

HSPs may be more stressed by the work environment than others, but they are often excellent performers. While managers sometimes undervalue them, HSPs can be a fantastic asset to the team. Their acute awareness of their surroundings enables them to spot problems before they escalate, and their insight and empathy mean that they understand the needs of other people.

HSPs tend to be creative, careful, conscientious and hardworking, and while they may be quiet in group situations, they are often excellent communicators. Here are some tried and tested ways to help your HSP colleagues realise their full potential.

1. Accept HSPs

Be open, understanding and receptive to their needs and create a relaxed, positive atmosphere in the workplace.

2. Deal with sources of stress

If your HSP team member is stressed, ask them what is bothering them. Whether it's too much noise, a colleague's smelly lunch or meetings that go on too long, don't be dismissive but address their concerns.

HSPs are highly sensitive to criticism, so be sure to include some positive feedback when reviewing their performance.

3. Give them space

If your HSP is an introvert, let them work alone. And if teamwork is essential, build some breaks into their schedule so that they can recharge.

4. Provide a quiet work environment

Create a calm, quiet place to work for your HSP colleague. Encourage them to have regular breaks throughout the day. But be fair about this and offer the same conditions to all your colleagues.

5. Try to avoid last-minute changes

If you have to change a schedule, try to give an HSP as much notice as possible. And if they get flustered, allow them space to regain their composure before a meeting or activity.

By creating a calm, supportive working environment for your highly sensitive team members, you will maximise their creativity and productivity, benefiting your team and your company.

In a relationship with a highly sensitive person? Here's how to show you love them

If you're in a relationship with an HSP, it can sometimes feel like you're walking on eggshells. Here's how to support them and show your love.

1. Use positive words

Words matter deeply to HSPs, so use language thoughtfully. Criticism- even an offhand remark - can cut them deeply, so keep it to a minimum. Instead, tell your HSP partner that you love them, compliment their appearance, and reminisce about shared happy memories - it'll mean the world to them.

2. Check in on them

HSPs are desperate not to inconvenience others. So if your HSP seems subdued or quieter than usual, check in on them and ask them how they are. They'll deeply appreciate the fact that you've noticed.

3 Indulge their supercharged senses

Discover what gives your HSP the most enjoyment and treat them to beautiful art, a walk to listen to the dawn chorus or a delicious meal. Thanks to their super-sensitive nature, you might get tears, but they'll be tears of joy.

4. Check your own vibes

HSPs are highly observant of tiny details in others. It's almost as if they take on their moods and emotions. So if you come home in a bad temper or sulking, your HSP partner will "catch" your mental state. Try to be more aware of the vibes you give out and replace negative behaviour with positivity.

5. Respect their limits

While it might not make much sense, respect the limits and wishes of your HSP. Something that seems unimportant to you may be essential to your partner's wellbeing. Bear in that HSPs experience physical touch very intensely. Hugs and kisses are vital to HSPs - but keep it gentle and with consent!

6. Notice them

Your HSP pays close attention to you and wants you to notice them in return. So while you might never be aware of tiny things as intensely as they are, just try - a little effort goes a long way!

A final thought

If you or someone you are close to is an HSP, you are likely to feel things more deeply, whether positive or negative. The "highs" may be joyful, but the "lows" may impact your work, relationships, and resilience. So develop a plan to manage your emotions in challenging situations so that you don't feel overwhelmed.


Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4086365/ 

https://www.highlysensitivesociety.com/blog/tips-to-fight-stress-anxiety-depression-negative-thoughts

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-athletes-way/202006/how-tell-if-youre-highly-sensitive


Marie Pure

Other articles


20 natural ways to prevent and relieve headaches

20 natural ways to prevent and relieve headaches

Headaches can be a real nuisance, especially if you get them frequently. Luckily, there are many natural ways to prevent and relieve headaches without needing to reach for over the counter medication.

Read the complete article

Dealing with British Summer Time

Dealing with British Summer Time

Some people are overly sensitive to the time change and it can take days, if not weeks, for them to feel right again, while others barely even notice. 

Read the complete article

Do We Label Too Fast

Do We Label Too Fast?

Nowadays, it can sometimes seem almost everyone has a mental health issue or learning disorder. But, are we too quick to label people, or is it that we are more aware of the problems? This article looks at some of the issues surrounding these sensitive questions.

Read the complete article

Six things we think will make us happy, but don't!

Six things we think will make us happy, but don't!

When you think about things that will make you happy, what are the images that come to mind? Wealth, beauty, a dream house, long holidays, a top of the range car? Happiness is not a constant and how happy we feel depends on the way we choose to live our lives. 

Read the complete article

Is it OCD Find out!

Is it OCD? Find out!

While you often hear people joking that they have OCD because they like to keep their house clean and tidy, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder can be a distressing and debilitating mental health condition with a wide range of symptoms.

Read the complete article

Is the world as we know it over

Is the world as we know it over?

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the world have taken unprecedented measures to stop the spread of coronavirus. The rapid changes we've seen have had an impact on almost every aspect of our lives.

Read the complete article

"Bach Flower Advice" becomes "Mariepure"

"Bach Flower Advice" becomes "Mariepure"

After 25 years in the Bach flower world, we asked ourselves, is now the right time for our own new name? Not only have we grown, but so have you, along with the confidence you have in us. That's why we want to connect ourselves to our own name. That name is Mariepure.

Read the complete article

How to be less judgemental of others (and yourself!)

How to be less judgemental of others (and yourself!)

Do you feel you’re always criticising and judging everyone, yourself included? Do you feel bad about it afterwards? You’re certainly not alone! Read on to discover how you can judge less and start to accept things the way they are.

Read the complete article

Isn't depression just a fancy word for feeling a bit down

Isn't depression just a fancy word for feeling a bit down?

Mental health issues such as depression and anxiety affect around 1 in 6 people at some stage of their life. Despite it being such a common problem, many sufferers wait months or even years before seeking help.

Read the complete article

Why you're not the best

Why you're not the best

What are your aims in life? Do you plan to be rich, to be a top footballer, to be a good parent, or to become Prime Minister? However efficiently you plan your life, sooner or later you are going to come up against obstacles to achieving your goals.

Read the complete article

Free personal advice for your problem?

Are you unsure which Bach flowers can help you? Contact Tom for free advice.

tom vermeersch
Tom Vermeersch

Yes, I want free advice

No thanks, I will do my own research